linemen restoring electricity

My neighbor has power, but I do not; How DTE prioritizes electrical restoration

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Crews are working as safely and quickly as possible to restore your power in the wake of the most significant weather event in company history. We follow a prioritized process for electric restoration that begins with:

• Addressing dangerous situations, such as downed power lines
• Restoring health and safety facilities, like hospitals and police stations

We then focus on the largest blocks of customers first because, in many cases, we can restore hundreds of customers as quickly as we can restore one. The order is:

• Substations that serve entire communities
• Lines that feed large subdivisions and businesses
• Equipment that powers individual homes

Once we restore a circuit, some individual customers may still be without power because of secondary damage. This means that sometimes customers in a neighborhood will have power while others in the same neighborhood will not. It is also why some customers may be restored; yet still see localized outages in their area.

As we move through the prioritization list, our pace of restoration has decreased. That’s because we focused on the largest groups of customers early in the restoration process. To ensure we restore remaining customers as quickly as possible, we’re adding another 80 linemen from out-of-state Sunday. We will continue to work around the clock until each and every customer is restored.

At the moment, there are more than 1,700 linemen working to restore power to our customers along with nearly 1,000 tree trimmers.