Empowering Michigan https://empoweringmichigan.com Mon, 17 Dec 2018 16:41:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.1 Deck the halls…the walls, the roof, and a bucket truck? https://empoweringmichigan.com/deck-the-hallsthe-walls-the-roof-and-a-bucket-truck/ Fri, 14 Dec 2018 15:07:26 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9305 During the Holiday season, people like to decorate nearly anything with Christmas lights, and in DTE’s Distribution Operations, bucket trucks are no exception. This year, Carl Simm, a lineman at the Redford Service Center and Jason Barnett, a lineman at the Newport Service Center, spent nearly 10 days decorating a bucket truck and trailer, with […]

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During the Holiday season, people like to decorate nearly anything with Christmas lights, and in DTE’s Distribution Operations, bucket trucks are no exception.

This year, Carl Simm, a lineman at the Redford Service Center and Jason Barnett, a lineman at the Newport Service Center, spent nearly 10 days decorating a bucket truck and trailer, with just one goal in mind: spreading holiday cheer.

On Thursday, the crew shined their lights on children at Beaumont Royal Oak, during the hospital’s “Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams” event. During the event pediatric patients shine flashlights from hospital windows and look for community members standing outside the hospital to flash them back. The event takes place every evening in December.

“Even kids in the hospital deserve to have a good Christmas, with all the stuff they’re going through,” Barnett said. “If we can put a smile on their faces that’s all that matters.”

For years, different service centers have decorated trucks for holiday parades and other events. A few strings of lights, some wrapping paper on the bucket and that’s it. When Simm joined the company as a lineman apprentice six years ago, he wanted to brighten things up.

“It started off with me just wanting to do my own hometown parade,” said Simm of Allen Park. “I’d use my own lights and decorations, and after the parade I’d take everything off to have the truck back in service the next day.”

Simm and Barnett teamed up in 2015 at the Newport Service Center to decorate a truck, and every year since, the project has grown. Today, the truck features more than 30,000 lights, over 800 feet of extension cord, thousands of zip ties, two 6,000 watt generators, an audio system, inflatables and lawn ornaments. A 25-foot trailer attached to the back of the truck is set up with utility poles and lights to resemble primary and secondary power lines.

“I do it for the smiles,” Barnett said. “It’s just really nice to see all of the families come out to see us.”

The DTE holiday truck will return to “Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams” on December 20, 24 and 25.

“I grew up not having much. I’m extremely fortunate today to have a job with this company,” Simm said. “I could sit at home with my family, but instead, I’ll be there giving back.”

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Cook safely with natural gas this holiday season   https://empoweringmichigan.com/cook-safely-with-natural-gas-this-holiday-season/ Wed, 12 Dec 2018 16:12:16 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9273 You may do your best to be the Rachel Ray’s and Emeril’s of the holiday season, which is why you choose natural gas for quicker, easier and cleaner cooking with the most precise temperatures, control and even heat. In fact, 9 out of 10 chefs prefer using natural gas when it comes to cooking.   Yet no matter how skilled you are at […]

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You may do your best to be the Rachel Ray’s and Emeril’s of the holiday season, which is why you choose natural gas for quicker, easier and cleaner cooking with the most precise temperatures, control and even heat. In fact, 9 out of 10 chefs prefer using natural gas when it comes to cooking.  

Yet no matter how skilled you are at the sauté flip, or searing the perfect piece of meat or fish, DTE Energy wants to make sure you’re staying safe when cooking with natural gas this holiday season.  

Here are a few quick tips to keep your kitchen safe and bellies full: 

  1. Check your flame color – Blue is beautiful. If it’s yellow, that could indicate your gas appliance or ducts aren’t working properly. 
  2. Choose the right size pot, and make sure the flame doesn’t extend beyond its edges.  
  3. Don’t allow water to boil over. While it could put out the flame, the gas is still running, increasing chances for danger. 
  4. Keep your burners and range top clean and clear of debris, including dish towels, cords, grease, leftover food pieces, boxes, plastic dishes and other materials.  
  5. When lighting manually, always light the match before turning on the range and gas.  
  6. Make a habit to check your knobs to ensure they’re fully off. If Aunt Betty or Uncle Fred accidentally bump the knob, it could let out a small amount of gas and overtime, that could be dangerous.  

If your burners are off completely and you still smell gas – know what to do: 

  • Leave the area 
  • Call 9-1-1 
  • Then call DTE (or your local gas provider) at 800-947-5000 

Finally, if you suffer from persistent headaches, dizziness, fatigue or nausea – and feel better when you’re outside of away from the home or kitchen, this could indicate something more dangerous – carbon monoxide poisoning. 

If you notice these signs – you must leave immediately and call 9-1-1. Read more signs here 

 

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A hydro power play bridging to a renewable energy future https://empoweringmichigan.com/a-hydro-power-play-bridging-to-a-renewable-energy-future/ Fri, 07 Dec 2018 16:58:00 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9256 For 45 years, DTE has tapped a distinctive technology to generate reliable, affordable and cleaner electricity. The Ludington Pumped Storage Power Plant on Lake Michigan in Mason County generates hydroelectric power using a simple technology capitalizing on the daily cycle of energy supply and demand. Located on a 1,000-acre site south of Ludington, the plant […]

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For 45 years, DTE has tapped a distinctive technology to generate reliable, affordable and cleaner electricity. The Ludington Pumped Storage Power Plant on Lake Michigan in Mason County generates hydroelectric power using a simple technology capitalizing on the daily cycle of energy supply and demand.

Located on a 1,000-acre site south of Ludington, the plant is an engineering marvel, a key part of DTE’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions by more than 80 percent, and an energy source now being upgraded to increase its output and extend its life for 50 more years.

The plant consists of a man-made reservoir located 363 feet above six 300-ton turbines. It works by pumping Lake Michigan water uphill to the 27 billion-gallon reservoir at night when energy demand and costs are lower and releases the stored water downhill through the turbines to generate electricity during the day when energy demand is higher. The reversible turbines work as pumps at night and power generators during the day.

The Ludington Pumped Storage Power Plant, with the reservoir at left and Lake Michigan at right. When the plant went online in 1973, Ludington was the largest facility of its kind in the world. It now ranks fifth worldwide in terms of energy output for pumped storage facilities.

The huge reservoir – covering 639 football fields – serves as a natural battery of stored power. Because Ludington uses pumped water storage, it doesn’t impact fish or wildlife. Nets are annually installed to prevent fish from being drawn into plant intakes.

“Ludington provides energy at a moment’s notice,” said Ryan Randazzo, a 15-year DTE employee who manages the company’s “peaker” power plants, which generate electricity when demand soars. “We can hit peak output in only 30 minutes. Ludington is a sustainable, clean, reliable energy source that quickly responds to the daily, weekly and seasonal highs and lows of Michigan’s energy demand. The plant helps keep energy bills lower because we avoid having to buy expensive outside electricity when demand peaks.”

An $800 million upgrade project to replace each of the six turbines is on schedule and budget. The work started in 2013 and will be complete in 2020. Ludington will then produce enough power for 1.65 million residential customers – an increase of 250,000 over the current output.

Ludington is co-owned and jointly managed by DTE and Consumers Energy. While the 41 employees who keep the plant running are Consumers employees and the plant is located in the electric service territory of Consumers, the energy produced at Ludington goes to customers of both companies. DTE and Consumers have jointly applied to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to operate Ludington for another 50 years.

Michigan doesn’t have other pumped storage power plants along its nearly 3,000 miles of Great Lakes shoreline because Ludington possesses a unique combination of environmentally-appropriate shoreline and geography. It was built in the perfect place at the perfect time.

The Ludington Plant is taking on added importance as DTE continues its transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy generation. The primary technological challenge to wind and solar sources replacing fossil fuels, especially in states like Michigan, is how to store energy when the wind is blowing and the sun is shining to provide the grid with 24/7 energy. As Ludington’s new turbines produce more output, the plant will continue serving well into the future, providing power when demand peaks and as a 24/7 battery supporting wind and solar.

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Breaking through a barrier to employment https://empoweringmichigan.com/dte-helped-bring-about-an-end-to-driver-responsibility-fees-in-michigan/ Wed, 05 Dec 2018 16:14:26 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9244 Being a good corporate citizen in the Great Lakes State means doing things that customers, employees, investors, and business partners expect to see – like operating in an environmentally sustainable manner, providing philanthropic support for nonprofit groups, and being a welcoming, inclusive place to work. It also means getting involved in elevating the economy and […]

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Being a good corporate citizen in the Great Lakes State means doing things that customers, employees, investors, and business partners expect to see – like operating in an environmentally sustainable manner, providing philanthropic support for nonprofit groups, and being a welcoming, inclusive place to work. It also means getting involved in elevating the economy and the quality of life for all kinds of people, beyond those involved with the company.

Two years ago, one of those issues surfaced at the Mayor’s Workforce Development Board, co-chaired by Dave Meador, vice chairman and chief administrative officer at DTE Energy. It involved Driver Responsibility Fees (DRFs), and DTE Energy got involved the solution.

Implemented in 2003 to bolster state revenue, DRFs layered penalties on top of fines for various driving offenses. The fees were up to $500 per year for people who accumulated several points on their driving record, as well as additional annual fines up to $1,000 per year on those caught for greater offenses like driving on a suspended license or driving under the influence. The fees ended when points expired after two years. Failing to pay resulted in a suspended license. And once a license was suspended it cost another $125 to reinstate. Drivers mired in the DRF zone then faced massive auto insurance cost increases – and this in Michigan, where auto insurance rates have been the most expensive in the nation for five consecutive years.

Beginning fifteen years ago, having a poor driving record in Michigan meant up to $1,500 in annual fees levied on top of traffic offense fines. While implemented to bolster the state budget, fee collection rates were low, thousands of people lost their licenses, and many left the workforce.

Those who could afford to pay their way out of DRFs did so – and the state got about $100 million in revenue. But most couldn’t pay the fines and about $627 million in unpaid DRFs accumulated among almost 350,000 drivers, among them 76,000 Detroiters. It was a punishing cycle of debt among those who could least afford it.

The fallout got worse. Poor driving records, crushing fees, and soaring auto insurance rates – additionally influenced by credit scores – excluded people from being hired. Employers statewide witnessed a shrinking pool of workers attributed to those unable to legally drive to work – or to take kids to school, or drive to the grocery store in a state with traditionally poor public transportation options.

The Mayor’s Workforce Development Board and the regional CEO group recognized DRFs as a serious barrier to employment, and DTE responded.

“Part of ensuring the city, region and state prosper with a healthy, thriving workforce is identifying barriers to employment and finding solutions,” said Meador. “DRFs made no sense at all. The only impact the fees were having was ensuring many people would never drive again, which made it hard to find work. Eliminating DRFs altogether and erasing the prior fees was the right thing to do for the people of Michigan.”

DTE joined numerous other employers and organizations like the Michigan District Judges Association to make state legislators aware of the DRF problem and work on a solution.

“Many lawmakers in both parties and representing areas throughout Michigan had heard that DRFs weren’t working – it just took someone to surface the issue,” said Rodney Cole, DTE’s director of state government affairs. “Bipartisan support followed and an eight-bill package initially proposed by the Mayor’s Workforce Development Board was approved by the Michigan legislature earlier this year and signed by Governor Snyder.”

Dave Meador, vice chairman and chief administrative officer at DTE Energy co-chairs the Mayor’s Workforce Development Board, where DRFs first surfaced as a barrier to employment that had to be addressed.

DRFs formally ended on September 30. Those with outstanding DRFs benefitted from an amnesty.

“DTE will continue to advocate and move forward on lowering and eliminating barriers to employment,” said Meador. “Like most Michiganders, we want to see lawmakers enact some form of equitable auto insurance reform. Licensing reform is another area where we feel costs and time commitments are preventing entrepreneurs and others from entering certain professions. We’re hopeful bipartisan support grows to lower employment barriers faced by returning citizens – people rejoining society after serving time in jail or prison. We’re supporting the legislative process to help those affected by barriers to employment to achieve equitable outcomes enabling them to be a part of a thriving economy with prospering families.”

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How to create holiday traditions to last a lifetime https://empoweringmichigan.com/how-to-create-holiday-traditions-to-last-a-lifetime/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 22:27:31 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9216 Many people look forward to spending time with friends and family during the holidays. Family dinners, game nights with friends, tree trimming parties and holiday movie marathons are a few of the traditions that spruce up social calendars between Thanksgiving and the New Year. Maybe you’re a big family adding to existing traditions, or new […]

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Many people look forward to spending time with friends and family during the holidays. Family dinners, game nights with friends, tree trimming parties and holiday movie marathons are a few of the traditions that spruce up social calendars between Thanksgiving and the New Year.

Maybe you’re a big family adding to existing traditions, or new parents looking to build new ones. Perhaps you’re newlyweds out to create new memories or a group of close friends who just want to bond. Whatever the case, we’ve got you covered with ideas will up your anticipation for the holidays:  

  • Choose a new ornament that represents a special memory made during the year or simply brings your loved ones to mind.
  • Volunteering is a holiday tradition that never goes out of style. Grab some friends, choose a cause and go make an impact.
  • Take holiday pictures that can chronicle the growth and evolution of your family or friend group over time. Make it even more fun by wearing coordinated outfits, including cozy pajamas!
  • Swap your favorite book with a loved one who has great taste in literature. The bonus? You’ll get a good read out of the deal, too.   
  • The holidays come alive with light shows across the state! Grab the kids (young and old) and take in the beauty during one of these Michigan light displays.
  • Think you’re the best baker or cook in your family? Have an annual cook-off to see who makes the best chocolate chip cookies or chili in the family.
  • Learn about the holiday traditions of a different culture, or grow knowledge of your own. Make it fun by trying out a culturally related recipe or learning how to wish others “Happy Holidays!”

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Where to hit the slopes in Michigan https://empoweringmichigan.com/where-to-hit-the-slopes-in-michigan/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 22:24:43 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9212 As the snow starts to fall, Michigan skiers and snowboarders can’t wait to hit the slopes. In fact, with 51 different ski areas, 1,000 runs and 50 terrain parks, Michigan ranks second in the U.S. when it comes to the number of skiing areas in one state. The snowboarding community recognizes Michigan’s very own Muskegon […]

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As the snow starts to fall, Michigan skiers and snowboarders can’t wait to hit the slopes. In fact, with 51 different ski areas, 1,000 runs and 50 terrain parks, Michigan ranks second in the U.S. when it comes to the number of skiing areas in one state. The snowboarding community recognizes Michigan’s very own Muskegon as the “birthplace of snowboarding” after Sherman Poppen tied two skis together for his daughters in 1965. With the mitten being the perfect place for winter sports and with so many different ski locations to choose from, we’ve listed a few of our favorites for you to enjoy this winter.

Mount Bohemia and Voodoo Mountain

If you’d like to visit the Western Upper Peninsula, Mount Bohemia, located in Mohawk, features the highest vertical drop in the Midwest at 900 feet. This location is also home to the state’s longest run, Ghost Trail, which is 1.74 miles in length. Voodoo Mountain, a new addition to the resort, will open this December and has a vertical drop of around 700 feet. Along with this addition, the resort also claims it will be “the first commercial snowcat operation east of the Rockies” where, instead of ski lifts, individuals can be taken up the mountain in 18-person snowcat and later be picked up by the vehicle after they’ve made it down the mountain. 

Boyne Resorts

Just 30 miles apart from each other, sister locations Boyne Mountain Resort and Boyne Highlands are great for avid skiers and snowboarders. Boyne Resorts is the largest privately-owned ski and golf corporation in the country. Boyne Mountain, located in Boyne Falls, offers 60 downhill runs spanning over 415 acres. Boyne Highlands, located in Harbor Springs, contains 435 skiable acres, features the highest vertical terrain in the Lower Peninsula at 552 feet and has 55 runs available. Skiing and snowboarding aren’t your thing? The resort also has other activities such as ice skating, snowshoeing, and even a zip line open to people of all ages. If you’d like to warm up and grab a bite to eat, enjoy some great American cuisine at Everett’s.

Crystal Mountain

SKI Magazine recognized the family-owned Crystal Mountain Resort as a 2018 Golden Eagle Award winner. Not to mention, Conde Nast Traveler listed it as a top ten best ski resort for families. The mountain, located in Thompsonville, has 58 downhill slopes, including 27 that are lit for those who want to hit the slopes for some skiing after sundown. The vertical drop is around 375 feet making this a great location for beginners to develop their skills. The resort also has 15.5 miles of cross-country skiing trails, including 2.5 miles of trail that’s lit up at night.

Looking for other ski locations in Michigan? Pure Michigan has a great list of locations to choose from here.

 

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What winter warriors need to know to beat the snow https://empoweringmichigan.com/what-winter-warriors-need-to-know-to-beat-the-snow/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 22:21:53 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9209 When the first major snow fall occurs in Michigan, people are reminded of the dangers winter weather can bring. With unexpected snow storms, rain, sleet, freezing roads, power outages, and more there is plenty Michiganders have to consider before stepping outside during the cold months. To prepare you for the inevitable, here are a few […]

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When the first major snow fall occurs in Michigan, people are reminded of the dangers winter weather can bring. With unexpected snow storms, rain, sleet, freezing roads, power outages, and more there is plenty Michiganders have to consider before stepping outside during the cold months. To prepare you for the inevitable, here are a few reminders to consider this winter.

When you’re out on the road

Snowy and icy road conditions can lead to mishap in an instant. Before you get behind the wheel this winter remember:

  • To make sure your tires are properly inflated
  • Your gas tank is at least half-full to avoid a freeze-up
  • You check the weather report before you leave

If you are traveling during wet conditions: accelerate and decelerate slowly to gain traction and drive cautiously but don’t slow down on snowy hills. Remember, if you don’t really have to go out, don’t! Curl up on the couch with a blanket and a good book instead.

When you’re riding out the storm indoors

While some severe winter storm predictions can get over-the-top, it doesn’t hurt to have precautions in place. To prepare for the unexpected it’s important to have an emergency preparedness kit on hand stocked with essentials including:

  • Water
  • Food
  • Batteries
  • Flashlight
  • Radio
  • First aid kit
  • Garbage bags
  • Multipurpose tool
  • Necessary medications
  • Cell phone with battery backup

It helps to also create a household evacuation plan and discuss scenarios with your loved ones.

When you’re clearing a path for Santa Claus

Another winter fact of life? You’ve got to keep those walks and driveways clear. If you have to shovel this year, here are some tips to remember from the National Safety Council:

  • Do not shovel after eating or while smoking
  • Take it slow
  • Shovel only fresh, powdery snow
  • Push the snow rather than lifting
  • Do not work to the point of exhaustion

Working outside in cold conditions can increase your heart rate and blood pressure, which can lead to more serious health risks if the above recommendations are not practiced.

When you’re winterizing your home

The winter is not always kind to people just like it’s not always kind to homes. To get ready for those chilling temps, keep an eye on your pipes and drains inside and outside of the home. Take the necessary precautions like pipe-wrapping and if you have a sprinkler system in your yard, make sure it’s clear of water before cold weather sets in. Don’t forget to examine doors and windows for gaps where warm air can escape. Check out this list of heating tips to keep you toasty all winter long.

While the winter can be an unforgiving time, it can also be very beautiful and magical. Be able to truly appreciate all the season has to offer by following these tips to staying safe. For more winter preparedness tips, check out Empowering Michigan.

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DTE Energy Foundation Contributes to Motown Museum Expansion https://empoweringmichigan.com/dte-energy-foundation-contributes-to-motown-museum-expansion/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 21:03:06 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9204 The best museums don’t just house artifacts—they deliver experiences. They tell a story. Thanks, in part, to a recent $500,000 grant from the DTE Energy Foundation, Motown Museum is one step closer to writing a powerful new chapter in a uniquely Detroit story. A Detroit institution since 1985, Motown Museum is in the middle of […]

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The best museums don’t just house artifacts—they deliver experiences. They tell a story. Thanks, in part, to a recent $500,000 grant from the DTE Energy Foundation, Motown Museum is one step closer to writing a powerful new chapter in a uniquely Detroit story.

A Detroit institution since 1985, Motown Museum is in the middle of a fundraising campaign for their $50 million expansion. First announced in late 2016, the expansion will grow the museum to a 50,000-square-foot world-class entertainment and education tourist destination featuring a range of dynamic, interactive exhibits, a performance theater and recording studio, an expanded retail experience and meeting spaces designed by renowned architects and exhibit designers.

“The Detroit fundraising community in general, and the DTE Energy Foundation specifically, has been incredibly supportive of our expansion,” said Robin R. Terry, CEO and chairwoman of the Museum. “They have stepped up and led the way to make this project a reality.”

The DTE Energy Foundation gift will support the restoration of three historic Motown-era homes, as well as the creation of an education and community engagement space on the Museum’s campus. This space will serve as an entrepreneurial incubator for young artists, and the home to Motown Museum’s summer camps and other signature Museum programs.

Motown Museum’s stated mission—to preserve, protect and present the Motown Story through authentic, inspirational and educational experiences—is much more than just an exercise in nostalgia. The museum is a living, breathing piece of American history: an authentic, one-of-a-kind experience and a testament to the enduring legacy of the artists and artistry that defined a generation.

The DTE Energy Foundation’s support for initiatives focused on the arts, culture and community transformation has had an indelible impact across Southeast Michigan. Motown Museum’s expansion promises to continue to build on that legacy. When completed, the expanded museum campus is expected to have a transformative impact on surrounding Detroit neighborhoods, providing employment, sustainability and community pride by serving as an important catalyst for new investment and tourism in a historic area.

“The DTE Energy Foundation does incredible work,” said Terry. “They are a true partner, committed to strengthening our cultural community and to the City of Detroit. They have embraced our vision of the Museum serving as an educational resource and the opportunity for our space to make a meaningful impact year after year.”

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Impacting lives in the Michigan communities where we live and serve https://empoweringmichigan.com/impacting-lives-in-the-michigan-communities-where-we-live-and-work/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 13:48:50 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=8780 The post Impacting lives in the Michigan communities where we live and serve appeared first on Empowering Michigan.

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Our business is providing clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and natural gas. Our commitment is to improve lives and promote growth. Recognized by Points of Light as one of the 50 best corporate citizens in the United States and the most community-minded energy company in the nation, DTE Energy is a transformational force for good.

Here’s a look back at what we’ve done over the past year, while we build on this momentum for many years to come.

 

PEOPLE

It’s about creating opportunity to improve lives. This year, more than 4,500 DTE employees and retirees rolled up their sleeves and put in over 70,000 volunteer hours helping 707 nonprofit groups in Michigan. The numbers are impressive and the impact immeasurable. Meaningful work and good pay cured the summertime blues for more than 1,600 Michigan youth. This summer over 1,000 college and high school students enjoyed challenging, paid jobs with professional work experiences at DTE. Even more, the DTE Foundation supported 645 additional student jobs throughout our service territory.

 

 

 

 

PLACES

Helping transform neighborhoods, we unveiled a $75 million plan to redevelop a disused former industrial site along the Huron River in Ann Arbor into a public park and mixed use development. And, we worked with residents in Detroit’s North End Community near our Caniff Service Center to improve safety, beautify public spaces, and repair homes. From Detroit to Grand Rapids and up to Escanaba, DTE and the DTE Foundation partnered with communities to support nearly 200 local events to bring Michiganders together and boost local economies. Over 250,000 visitors enjoyed more than 70 events at Beacon Park in downtown Detroit, including seasonal celebrations, live music, Night Markets, tailgate parties and fitness classes. A concert series entertained the area with free music, dancing, lights, and excitement. Lumen, Beacon Park’s award-winning restaurant, opened to acclaim; and the park is spurring neighborhood development toward a revitalized west central downtown community.

 

 

PLANET

Our leadership in cleaner energy and environmental stewardship has never been stronger. We advanced our goals to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent by building the Pine River Wind Park to power more than 54,000 homes with clean energy, part of our commitment to increase our investment in renewable energy by $1.7 billion over the next five years. We also broke ground on the $1 billion Blue Water Energy Center in St. Clair County, and made major strides in reducing methane, a greenhouse gas. The Electric Utility Industry Sustainable Supply Chain Alliance, a group of electric utilities developing a greener supply chain, named DTE Energy its member of the year. The Wildlife Habitat Council recognized DTE with its 2018 Corporate Conservation Leadership Award for achievement in conservation efforts and exemplary corporate commitment to biodiversity and conservation education.

 

 

PROGRESS

We’re powering a brighter tomorrow in the Great Lakes State by spending $1.4 billion[1] with Michigan-based suppliers, and creating or sustaining more than 16,000 jobs[2]. Chaired by DTE’s CEO Gerry Anderson, the Southeast Michigan Regional CEO Group launched a new 11-county economic development organization and made strong progress in partnership with the Detroit Public Schools Community District to continue revitalizing the Randolph and Breithaupt career technology education schools to advance development of training for needed employees in construction, hospitality, mechatronics and more. Our $2.1 billion, 255-mile Nexus Gas Transmission pipeline is now bringing natural gas from Pennsylvania through Ohio into Michigan, providing consumers with affordable, cleaner-burning and domestically-abundant gas.

 

 

 

PHILANTHROPY

Last year was about new highs in helping ignite community-based hope and inspiration to make a difference. Among the state’s largest foundations committed to Michigan-focused giving through nonprofits, the DTE Foundation created lasting impact by supporting initiatives focused on arts and culture, community transformation, economic progress, education and employment, environment and human needs.

 

 

 

 

To learn more about how we’re a force for growth and prosperity, visit DTEImpact.com.

 

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Flags everyone sees but few understand https://empoweringmichigan.com/dte-achieves-system-wide-environmental-sustainability-certification/ Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:53:12 +0000 https://empoweringmichigan.com/?p=9178 You may have noticed the flags, signs, and banners with a big “ISO” on them at manufacturing plants, industrial sites, and office buildings. ISO has to do with international specifications for products, services, and systems administered by the International Organization for Standardization based in Switzerland. ISO comes from the Greek isos, meaning equal, and the […]

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You may have noticed the flags, signs, and banners with a big “ISO” on them at manufacturing plants, industrial sites, and office buildings. ISO has to do with international specifications for products, services, and systems administered by the International Organization for Standardization based in Switzerland. ISO comes from the Greek isos, meaning equal, and the standards are meant to ensure quality, safety, and efficiency.

Flying those flags is a major pride point because companies invest a lot to become ISO-certified, which is good for growing their business and required by many major manufacturers.

The DTE team at its Trenton Channel Power Plant in 2001. This fossil fuel power plant was the first DTE facility to achieve ISO 14001 certification. Back then, Ford Motor Company required its suppliers to be ISO 14001-certified, so DTE confirmed its operations met ISO standards and then continued the process company-wide.

In 2001, the Trenton Channel Power Plant was the first DTE facility to achieve ISO 14001 certification. Back then, Ford Motor Company required its suppliers to be ISO 14001-certified, so DTE confirmed its operations met ISO standards and then continued the process company-wide.

DTE Energy has focused for decades on adhering to environmental regulations and in October, DTE drove that commitment deeper by achieving companywide ISO 14001 certification, providing independent confirmation that DTE’s environmental sustainability practices are meeting or exceeding government regulations and industry best practices.

With more than 75 of its facilities including power plants and natural gas facilities now ISO-certified, DTE is one of only a few energy companies in the nation to be entirely ISO 14001 third-party certified. The Ann Arbor-based NSF International conducted independent ISO audits as part of DTE’s certifications.

“For our customers, DTE’s operating with environmentally sustainable, ISO-certified practices ultimately means cost savings resulting from our commitment to pollution prevention, enhanced environmental compliance, and increased environmental awareness and engagement,” said Don Januszek, who leads DTE’s ISO efforts.

For DTE Energy, ISO certification affirms the company’s longstanding emphasis on prioritizing environmentally sustainable operations. DTE renewed its commitment to ISO 14001 certification in 2015 when the international standards were revised and the companywide environmental management system was centralized.

“Our 14 electric service centers are now all ISO-certified along with our electric production and gas operating facilities having achieved updated ISO certification,” said Januszek. The ISO flags and banners at our facilities prove we have a centralized, organization-wide environmental management system in place, administered by conscientious employees who are committed stewards of sustainability.”

Dozens of DTE employees are involved in ISO-driven cross-functional teams that bring the company’s environmental management system to life, including electric substations and service centers to fossil fuel generation, renewables like solar and wind, the Fermi 2 nuclear power plant in Monroe and natural gas facilities.

 DTE’s service centers are where the company’s electric service trucks and gear are maintained and dispatched for repairs, upgrades and other work throughout southeast Michigan.

While DTE’s electric power plants and natural gas facilities were already ISO-certified, they utilized individual, site-specific policies to manage everything from ozone-depleting substances like air conditioning systems to handling bulk chemicals and controlling air emissions from power plants. The environmental consequences of every electric and gas operation are now cataloged in terms of environmental risk and managed using one set of standard, companywide ISO-certified environmental policies and procedures in conjunction with site-specific policies.

DTE additionally uses ISO mechanisms to maintain Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) conservation program certifications at 36 plants and facilities statewide. The ISO program tracks WHC certifications as well as Neighborhood Environmental Partners (NEP) programs, compliance, energy efficiency, and other environmental goals.

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